Monday, September 26, 2016

THE INVENTION OF WINGS, BY SUE MONK KIDD

BOOK DISCUSSION DATE AND TIME: MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2016, AT 2:00 P.M.

Sarah Grimké was an actual early abolitionist and feminist whose upbringing in a slaveholding Southern family made her voice particularly controversial. Kidd re-imagines Sarah's life in tandem with that of a slave in the Grimké household. In 1803, 11-year-old Sarah receives a slave as her birthday present from her wealthy Charleston parents. Called Hetty by the whites, Handful is just what her name implies--sharp tongued and spirited. Precocious Sarah is horrified at the idea of owning a slave but is given no choice by her mother, a conventional Southern woman of her time who is not evil but accepts slavery (and the dehumanizing cruelties that go along with it) as a God-given right.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

THE ODD WOMAN AND THE CITY, BY VIVIAN GORNICK

BOOK DISCUSSION DATE AND TIME:
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2016 AT 2:00 P.M.

"A contentious, deeply moving ode to friendship, love, and urban life in the spirit of Fierce Attachments A memoir of self-discovery and the dilemma of connection in our time, The Odd Woman and the City explores the rhythms, chance encounters, and ever-changing friendships of urban life that forge the sensibility of a fiercely independent woman who has lived out her conflicts, not her fantasies, in a city (New York) that has done the same. Running steadily through the book is Vivian Gornick's exchange of more than twenty years with Leonard, a gay man who is sophisticated about his own unhappiness, whose friendship has "shed more light on the mysterious nature of ordinary human relations than has any other intimacy" she has known. The exchange between Gornick and Leonard acts as a Greek chorus to the main action of the narrator's continual engagement on the street with grocers, derelicts, and doormen; people on the bus, cross-dressers on the corner, and acquaintances by the handful. In Leonard she sees herself reflected plain; out on the street she makes sense of what she sees. Written as a narrative collage that includes meditative pieces on the making of a modern feminist, the role of the flaneur in urban literature, and the evolution of friendship over the past two centuries, The Odd Woman and the City beautifully bookends Gornick's acclaimed Fierce Attachments, in which we first encountered her rich relationship with the ultimate metropolis"-- Provided by publisher.  

 

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Thursday, July 14, 2016

AS CLOSE TO US AS BREATHING, BY ELIZABETH POLINER

BOOK CLUB DISCUSSION DATE AND TIME: 
TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, 2016, AT 11:00 A.M.
In 1948, a small stretch of the Woodmont, Connecticut shoreline, affectionately named “Bagel
Beach,” has long been the summer destination for Jewish families. Here, sisters Ada, Vivie, and Bec assemble at their beloved family cottage, with children in tow and weekend-only husbands who arrive each Friday in time for the Sabbath meal. During the week, freedom reigns. But when a terrible accident occurs on the sisters’ watch , a summer of hope and self-discovery transforms into a lifetime of atonement and loss.


Wednesday, June 8, 2016

THE DIVER'S CLOTHES LIE EMPTY

BOOK DISCUSSION DATE AND TIME: TUESDAY, JULY 12, 2016, AT 11:00 A.M.
From the acclaimed author of Let the Northern Lights Erase Your Name and The Lovers comes a tensely drawn, spellbinding literary thriller that gets to the heart of what defines us as human beings—the singular identity we create for ourselves in the world and the myriad alternative identities that lie just below the surface.

In Vendela Vida’s taut and mesmerizing novel of ideas, a woman travels to Casablanca, Morocco, on mysterious business. Almost immediately, while checking into her hotel, she is robbed, her passport and all identification stolen. The crime is investigated by the police, but the woman feels there is a strange complicity between the hotel staff and the authorities—she knows she’ll never see her possessions again.

Stripped of her identity, she feels both burdened by the crime and liberated by her sudden freedom to be anyone at all.  




Tuesday, May 10, 2016

MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON, BY ELIZABETH STROUT

BOOK DISCUSSION DATE AND TIME: MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2016, AT 1:00 P.M.

Set in the mid-1980s, Lucy Barton, hospitalized for nine weeks, is surprised when her estranged mother shows up at her bedside. Her mother talks of local gossip, but underneath the banalities, Lucy senses the love that cannot be expressed. This is the story that Lucy must write about, the one story that has shaped her entire life. A beautiful lyrical story of a mother and daughter and the love they share. -- Catherine Coyne for LibraryReads.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

THE BETRAYERS, BY DAVID BEZMOZGIS

Book discussion date and time: Monday, May 9, 2016, at 11:00 A.M.  Please note that we are meeting in the morning this month.)

Escaping his political opponents in a Crimean resort town, disgraced Israeli politician Baruch Kotler runs into a former friend who had him sent to the gulag forty years prior and must reconcile with his betrayer and his own poor choices.